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5 M’sian brands selling halal & Muslim-friendly bakkwa for delivery

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Growing up with a Chinese mum and Malay dad, I was exposed to different kinds of food from a young age. Each culture had its own traditional cuisine and delicacies, and I liked that I could enjoy them both. 

But at the same time, it was also a struggle to find halal alternatives for traditional Chinese food. In lieu of the popular char siew pau (pork buns), we’d go for the vegetarian kind. And instead of siew mai (pork dumplings) and bak kut teh, we’d replace the pork meat with chicken.

When it came to Chinese New Year, there was one treat that eluded my grasp—bakkwa. Also known as rougan, bakkwa is a Chinese salty-sweet dried meat product that’s similar to (but better than, some might argue) jerky. And commonly it’s made using pork meat, as with most other Chinese food.

Then I stumbled upon halal bakkwa that’s made using chicken. So in the spirit of the new year, I’d like to share my newfound knowledge of this delicious non-haram treat.

Here are five local brands to get your hands on halal and Muslim-friendly bakkwa:

Halal-certified 

1. Yippii Gift 

Image Credit: Yippii Gift

A familiar name to us at Vulcan Post, Yippii Gift is a local online cake store that offers same-day deliveries. Some of its signature products include Handmade French-inspired Mille Crepe Cake, Creamy Cheesecake, and its Light Sponge Cake.

So what is a cake brand doing in this list? It turns out that for Chinese New Year 2024, the brand isn’t limiting itself to just selling festive treats like pineapple tarts and chicken floss rolls. 

Image Credit: Yippii Gift

Collaborating with Kyros Kebab, a Malaysian homegrown halal-certified brand, Yippii Gift produced halal bakkwa. Each piece of bakkwa weighing 50g to 60g is individually vacuum packed and comes in a marinated honey flavour. 

Each pack of Yippii Gift’s bakkwa is 500g and sells for RM68. If you get the combo of three packs, you’ll get one free pack for the price of RM272. As for its expiration date, the brand’s website states that it can last up to 45 days at room temperature.

Where to buy: Yippii Gift’s website  

Price range: RM68 (1 pack ±50g) to RM272 (3 pack + 1 free)

Contact details: 012-922 9872

Delivery time: 9AM to 6PM on weekdays, 9AM to 1PM on Saturday. Delivery is not available on Sunday and Public Holiday.

Delivery fee: Free deliveries on orders above RM180. For orders below that, you can check its website for more details as they split locations into different zones.

2. Tawakkal Foods 

Image Credit: Tawakkal Foods

A food producer in Sepang, Tawakkal Foods is another brand that’s certified halal by JAKIM. According to its Facebook, its bakkwa is smoked until they’re 70% cooked, then finished through grilling over charcoal.

Called “Daging Salai Pelek” by the brand, there are three flavours to choose from:

  • Original
  • Spicy curry
  • Black pepper
Image Credit: Tawakkal Foods

Individually vacuum-sealed as well, Tawakkal Foods’ dried meat is sold in packs of 150g. Based on its Shopee page, the price ranges from RM20 to RM29 depending on which flavour you choose. There’s also a combo set consisting of all three flavours that’s priced at RM68.

Alternatively, customers can find them in-store at Mydin Subang Jaya Hypermarket, selected ST Rosyam Mart outlets, and Central Market in KL.

Where to buy: Tawakkal Foods’ Shopee page / In-store at the following locations:

  • Mydin Subang Jaya Hypermarket
  • ST Rosyam Mart Setiawangsa
  • St Rosyam Mart Shah Alam
  • Central Market, Kuala Lumpur

Price range: RM20 to RM29 (1 pack ±150g) 

Contact details: 011-5884 8259

Delivery time: N/A

Delivery fee: Depends on your location, based on the rates in its Shopee store.

3. Ikhwan Ng’s Halal Delight

Image Credit: Ikhwan Ng’s Halal Delight

A rather notable name in the halal bakkwa scene, Ikhwan Ng’s Halal Delight has been selling dried meat for quite a few years now. In fact, the Chinese Muslim convert was previously interviewed by Harian Metro in 2017. 

Speaking candidly to Harian Metro, the founder shared that his bakkwa brand was started as his own small means of dakwah (preaching). Not like the missionaries you find on trains trying to spread the holy word. But more to show people that there are halal options for such food. 

Located in Taiping, Perak, Ikhwan Ng’s Halal Delight comes mainly in the original honey flavour. Once the vacuum seal is opened, the brand recommends finishing the bakkwa within two weeks. Otherwise, they should be popped into the freezer. 

Image Credit: Ikhwan Ng’s Halal Delight

Customers can opt to purchase them in packs of either 500g (RM45.99) or 1KG (RM75.99) through its Shopee page.

Those living in Perak could also choose for courier delivery, which has a postage fee of RM10. However, if you’re in the Taiping area, there’s also the choice of cash-on-delivery (COD). Ikhwan told us that there is no COD charge for orders in Taiping. This can be arranged personally by contacting him on WhatsApp.

Where to buy: Ikhwan Ng’s Halal Delight’s Shopee page / In-person by contacting Ikhwan Ng’s WhatsApp

Price range: RM45.99 (±500g) to RM75.99 (±1KG)

Contact details: 012-397 9998

Delivery fee: Courier delivery is RM10 / If bought through Shopee then it depends on your location, based on the rates in its Shopee store.

4.  Little Apple 

Image Credit: Little Apple

Also a rather recognised name in the local halal-certified bakkwa field is Little Apple. Started by Huda Chew, Little Apple has been selling this treat for about as long as Ikhwan Ng’s Halal Delight.

Previously, she would sell the brand’s dried meat through Shopee. But she now has focused on a more direct approach, where customers can just pre-order with her through WhatsApp. These will be delivered to you either by courier or Lalamove. 

If you’re up for the drive, you could also arrange for self-collection at Dewan Serbaguna Seksyen 2 Wangsa Maju, KL. 

Image Credit: Little Apple

The bakkwas are sold in packs of 250g, each selling for RM28. For orders of five packets and above, customers can get a discount of RM5. The brand’s catalogue also includes assorted chicken meat floss in three flavours—original, spicy, and seaweed.

Based on its Facebook post, the last day to place your orders is on January 23. These will be delivered or become available for self pick-up starting from January 31.

Where to buy: Online pre-order by contacting Little Apple’s WhatsApp

Price range: RM28 (±250g)

Contact details: 016-458 4465

Delivery time: N/A

Delivery fee: Depends on your location. Huda Chew told us that the delivery rates is similar to the ones on Lalamove.

Muslim-friendly

5. Dendeng Station

Image Credit: Dendeng Station

Based in Johor, Dendeng Station is a brand that mainly sells Muslim-friendly bakkwa. According to its Facebook page, the company has been around for a few years and runs quite a good handful of stalls and food trucks in the area.

There, customers can taste the Muslim-friendly bakkwa on the spot, where a grill is prepped to heat up the treat. But if you’d prefer to have them elsewhere, you could choose to have them delivered to you.

Those living in Johor can arrange for a Grab or Lalamove delivery by contacting Dendeng Station’s phone number. For the rest of us, there’s the option of online delivery through its Shopee page. 

Image Credit: Dendeng Station

Its care instructions state that the brand’s bakkwa can last between five to 14 days if left unopened. Of course, this is dependent on the temperature of the room you keep it in.

If stored in the fridge, the bakkwa should be able to last for a few months. To eat it, all you have to do is heat it up briefly in the microwave or on the stove.

Where to buy: In-person at Dendeng Station’s stalls and food trucks in Johor / Shopee

Price range: RM23 (±140g) to RM55 (±400g)

Contact details: 012-922 9872

Delivery time: N/A

Delivery fee: Depends on your location, based on the rates in its Shopee store.

  • Read articles we’ve written about Malaysian startups here.

Featured Image Credit: Tawakkal Foods





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